Chrome to Mark HTTP Sites as ‘Not Secure’

Google Chrome will mark all HTTP encrypted sites as ‘not secure’, starting July this year. It currently displays a neutral information icon for these sites. But starting with its version 68 update, the browser will warn users with an extra notification in the address bar.

Google Chrome currently marks HTTPS encrypted sites with a green lock icon followed by ‘Secure’ (written in English). The secure HTTPS encryption secures the channel between your browser and the website you’re visiting.


This secure connection will ensure none can tamper the request to website or spy on what you’re doing. Without that encryption, someone with access to your router or ISP could intercept information or inject malware causing too many issues.

Chrome HTTPS

As per the Google’s latest report, in the last one year:

  • Over 68% of Chrome traffic on both Android and Windows is now protected.
  • Over 78% of Chrome traffic on both Chrome OS and Mac is now protected.
  • 81 of the top 100 sites on the web use HTTPS by default.

Here are some of the excerpts from the Google’s blog:

For the past several years, we’ve moved toward a more secure web by strongly advocating that sites adopt HTTPS encryption. And within the last year, we’ve also helped users understand that HTTP sites are not secure by gradually marking a larger subset of HTTP pages as ‘not secure’. Beginning in July 2018 with the release of Chrome 68, Chrome will mark all HTTP sites as ‘not secure’.


Chrome is dedicated to making it as easy as possible to set up HTTPS. Mixed content audits are now available to help developers migrate their sites to HTTPS in the latest Node CLI version of Lighthouse, an automated tool for improving web pages. The new audit in Lighthouse helps developers find which resources a site loads using HTTP, and which of those are ready to be upgraded to HTTPS simply by changing the subresource reference to the HTTPS version.

Chrome’s new interface will help users understand that all HTTP sites are not secure, and continue to move the web towards a secure HTTPS web by default. HTTPS is easier and cheaper than ever before, and it unlocks both performance improvements and powerful new features that are too sensitive for HTTP. Developers, check out our set-up guides to get started.

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About Phaneendra Varma 59 Articles
Cricket Fan. Follower of the Cricket game since 2003 World Cup!

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